Clinical Trial

Anatomical Correlates of Speech Discrimination

Study Description

Investigation of Anatomical Correlates of Speech Discrimination

Understanding speech is essential for good communication. Individuals with hearing loss and poor speech discrimination often have little success with hearing aids because amplifying sound improves audibility, but not clarity of the speech signal. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative importance of the sensory cells of the inner ear and auditory neurons on speech discrimination performance in quiet and in noise. This information may be used as a predictor of hearing aid benefit. The investigators expect to find decreased speech understanding ability resulting from both loss of sensory cells and the loss of auditory neurons.

Location

Locations Selected Location

Methods

No pharmaceutical medication involved No pharmaceutical medication involved
Patients and healthy individuals accepted Patients and healthy individuals accepted

Device - Hearing Aid fitting

Subjects with hfPTAs ranging from 0-55 dB HL will be recruitedwith 100 persons self-reporting difficulty HIN (> 50% of the time), and 100 persons reporting little difficulty HIN (< 50% of the time) will be randomly assigned to one of five groups (n = 200) based on enabled HA features using an online random assignment tool. Unaided HIQ and HIN assessments will be conducted in the sound field, and baseline DPOAE and CAP assessments will be measured. Subjects will be fit with binaural premium level ...read more on ClinicalTrials.org

Additional Information

Official Study Title

Investigation of Anatomical Correlates of Speech Discrimination

Clinical Trial ID

NCT01781039

ParticipAid ID

Pe99Pe