Clinical Trial

Transdermal Nicotine on Response Inhibition in Schizophrenia

Study Description

Effects of Transdermal Nicotine on Response Inhibition to Emotional Cues in Schizophrenia

The purpose of this study is to test whether nicotine, a drug that activates receptors called nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain, improves the ability to make or withhold responses to faces that are either emotionally neutral or emotionally negative. This study will also test whether the drug affects brain activity while making or withholding responses using electroencephalography. Previous studies in people with schizophrenia have shown that more errors in response to negative emotional cues are related to greater likelihood of impulsive aggressive behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine whether nicotine might be a new strategy to reduce aggressive behavior. The investigators' goal is 25 individuals with schizophrenia and 25 healthy controls to complete the study at Vanderbilt.

Location

Locations Selected Location

Methods

Pharmaceutical medication involved Pharmaceutical medication involved
Patients and healthy individuals accepted Patients and healthy individuals accepted

Drug - Nicotine Patch, 7 Mg/24 Hr

Nicotine patch, 7 mg/24 hour will be applied to the skin.

Drug - Placebo patch

Placebo skin patch will be applied to the skin.

Additional Information

Official Study Title

Effects of Transdermal Nicotine on Response Inhibition to Emotional Cues in Schizophrenia

Clinical Trial ID

NCT03838484

ParticipAid ID

bDkEAa