Clinical Trial

Oxytocin at Elective Cesarean Deliveries

Study Description

Oxytocin at Elective Cesarean Deliveries: A Dose-finding Study in Women With Twin Pregnancy

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) due to uterine atony is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Uterotonic drugs are used to improve the muscle tone of the uterus after birth and these are effective at reducing the incidence of PPH. Large doses of this drug are associated with adverse effects like lower blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart rhythms and changes on ECG. Various international bodies recommend varying and high doses of oxytocin in elective cesarean sections. A study performed at Mount Sinai Hospital showed that a much smaller doses of oxytocin is required (ED95 being 0.35IU). Women who had twins were excluded from this study. It is known that women with a twin pregnancy have a higher risk of poor tone and postpartum hemorrhage. The investigators seek to find the best dose of oxytocin for the patients with a twin pregnancy. A higher dose may be needed to contract the uterus adequately.

Location

Locations Selected Location

Methods

Pharmaceutical medication involved Pharmaceutical medication involved
Patients and healthy individuals accepted Patients and healthy individuals accepted

Drug - Oxytocin

Oxytocin administered intravenously, over 1 minute following delivery of the fetal head

Additional Information

Official Study Title

Oxytocin at Elective Cesarean Deliveries: A Dose-finding Study in Women With Twin Pregnancy

Clinical Trial ID

NCT04025658

ParticipAid ID

dPNk1a