Clinical Trial

Neural Correlates of Hypoalgesia Driven by Observation

Study Description

Neural Correlates of Hypoalgesia Driven by Observation

Placebo effects held an ambivalent place in health care for at least two centuries. On the one hand, placebos are traditionally used as controls in clinical trials to correct for biases and the placebo response is viewed as an effect to be factored out in order to isolate and accurately measure the effects of the treatment. On the other hand, there is scientific evidence that placebo effects represent fascinating psychoneurobiological events involving the contribution of distinct central nervous as well as peripheral physiological mechanisms that influence pain perception and clinical pain symptoms and substantially modulate the response to pain therapeutics. Therefore, placebo effects have shifted from being a challenge for clinical trials to a resource to trigger the reduction of pain based on endogenous mechanisms that can be activated in the brain to promote hypolagesia, self-healing, and well-being. This is relevant in acute pain settings given that chronic opioid users die within approximately 2.5 years of being prescribed their first opioid medication to treat acute pain. The overall hypothesis is that observational learning influences neural pain modulation and cognition systems, including processes associated with mentalizing (the ability to cognitively understand mental states of others), empathy (the ability to share an emotional experience), and expectancy (the anticipation of a benefit). The objective is to determine the brain mechanisms of observationally-induced analgesia using brain mapping approaches that target changes in blood oxygenation and oscillatory activity in the brain, thus enabling investigators to draw inferences about the localization and extent of neurobiological activation underlying hypoalgesia driven by observation. Therefore, the investigators designed innovative experiments using pharmacological fMRI, EEG, and combined EEG-fMRI measurements.

Location

Locations Selected Location

Methods

Pharmaceutical medication involved Pharmaceutical medication involved
Patients and healthy individuals accepted Patients and healthy individuals accepted

Drug - Naloxone

Intravenous Naloxone will be administered based on the participant's weight, with 0.15 mg/kg given as an initial bolus plus 0.2 mg/kg/hr during the fMRI experiment. A random allocation sequence will be independently generated by the UM Pharmacy. The Principal investigator will call for each experiment.

Saline

Intravenous Normal Saline (0.9% sodium chloride) will be administered shortly before beginning the fMRI experiment. A random allocation sequence will be independently generated by the UM Pharmacy. The Principal investigator will call for each experiment.

Additional Information

Official Study Title

Neural Correlates of Hypoalgesia Driven by Observation

Clinical Trial ID

NCT03897998

ParticipAid ID

e9r7Ya