Clinical Trial

Walking Performance in Veterans with Leg Amputations

Study Description

Does Walking Performance Improve When Veterans With Leg Amputations Are Given Visual Feedback?

Previous studies suggest that Veterans with below the knee amputation using passive-elastic or powered prostheses have impaired physical function, which could increase the risk of osteoarthritis, leg/back pain, and diabetes/obesity. Utilization of rehabilitation strategies/techniques such as real-time visual feedback training could restore physical function, increase physical activity, and reduce injury risk. The investigators will systematically determine the effects of using real-time visual feedback training of peak propulsive (push-off) force during walking while Veterans with below the knee amputations use a passive-elastic and battery-powered prosthesis. Similar to previous studies of non-amputee older (>65 years) and post-stroke adults, use of real-time visual feedback training of propulsive force will likely improve walking function in Veterans with amputations. Such training presents a promising rehabilitation strategy that could reduce comorbidities, while improving quality of life, comfort, and physical function, and advancing rehabilitation research and prosthetic development.

Location

Locations Selected Location

Methods

No pharmaceutical medication involved No pharmaceutical medication involved
Patients and healthy individuals accepted Patients and healthy individuals accepted

Device - Passive-elastic prosthetic foot

The investigators will measure the biomechanics (motion, forces, and muscle activity) and metabolic rates while subjects walk using their own passive-elastic prosthesis with and without visual feedback of peak propulsive force targets.

Device - Powered ankle-foot prosthesis

The investigators will measure the biomechanics (motion, forces, and muscle activity) and metabolic rates while subjects walk using a battery-powered ankle-foot prosthesis with and without visual feedback of peak propulsive force targets.

Additional Information

Official Study Title

Can Sensory Feedback Training Improve the Biomechanical and MetabolicEffects of Using Passive or Powered Lower Limb Prostheses During Walking forVeterans With Transtibial Amputations?

Clinical Trial ID

NCT03974945

ParticipAid ID

erkl2a