Clinical Trial

Treatment of Brain Cancer

Study Description

Stereotactic Radiosurgery Compared With Hippocampal-Avoidant Whole Brain Radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) Plus Memantine for 5-15 Brain Metastases

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a commonly used treatment for brain tumors. It is a one-day (or in some cases two day), out-patient procedure during which a high dose of radiation is delivered to small spots in the brain while excluding the surrounding normal brain. Whole brain radiation therapy with hippocampal avoidance (HA-WBRT) is when radiation therapy is given to the whole brain, while trying to decrease the amount of radiation that is delivered to the area of the hippocampus. The hippocampus is a brain structure that is important for memory. Memantine is a drug that is given to help relieve symptoms that can be caused by WBRT, including problems with memory and other mental symptoms. Health Canada, the regulatory body that oversees the use of drugs in Canada, has not approved the sale or use of memantine in combination with WBRT to treat this kind of cancer, although they have allowed its use in this study.

Location

Locations Selected Location

Methods

Pharmaceutical medication involved Pharmaceutical medication involved
Recruiting patients only Recruiting patients only

Drug - Memantine

20 mg (10 mg divided twice daily). Dose will be escalated by 5 mg per week. Memantine should start at 5 mg, and then increased in 5 mg increments at the following schedule, depending on the patient's response and tolerance:

Radiation - Hippocampal-avoidant (HA-WBRT) Radiotherapy

30Gy in 10 fractions

Procedure - Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)

18-20 or 22 Gy in single fraction

Additional Information

Official Study Title

A Phase III Trial of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Compared With Hippocampal-Avoidant Whole Brain Radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) Plus Memantine for 5-15 Brain Metastases

Clinical Trial ID

NCT03550391

ParticipAid ID

penn5e